The best bistros and signature cuisine chefs of Buenos Aires

You can sacrifice environment, or even service, but according to the bistronomic movement, there is one thing that must be high-end: the kitchen.

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The best bistros and signature cuisine chefs of Buenos Aires

Nov 10, 2015

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You can sacrifice environment, or even service, but according to the bistronomic movement, there is one thing that must be high-end: the kitchen.

This term, a mixture of words “bistro” and “gastronomy”- was adopted by the French Journalist Sébastien Demorand to give a name to a trend that was already installed in Europe: lots of young and talented cooks who had decided to open their own restaurants in the antithesis to the large temples of Parisian gastronomy: no luxury rooms, or silverware, lots of kitchen employees or a ceremonial and rigid attention. In these new bistros, attention would be paid to food. The atmosphere? Much more austere and relaxed. The service? Kind, but informal. The menu? There is no menu.

EVERY DAY BOARDS ARE WRITTEN WITH THE NEW DISHES OFFERED, COOKED WITH THE FRESHEST INGREDIENTS IN THE MARKET.

A paradigmatic case of this philosophy is the Parisian Le Chateaubriand, property of the Basque-French Iñaki Aizpitarte, nowadays ranked number 21 among the best 50 restaurants in the world.

In recent years, Buenos Aires saw many Argentine chefs turning to the bistronomic side of gastronomy. Below you will find four proposals to remember, listed by neighborhood:




RECOLETA: ARAMBURU BIS

Gonzalo Aramburu is one of the great Argentine chefs who decided to democratize his cuisine and make it accessible to a wider audience. He still has his high-end version (Aramburu) in Constitución, but in 2018 he changed his more informal and economic version, Bis, to the beautiful sight of Correo, in Recoleta. In charge of the kitchen is Julio Baez (former Sofitel) and the menu changes periodically according to the freshest products in the market and the seasonal products.

ADDRESS: VICENTE LÓPEZ 1661, RECOLETA


SAN ISIDRO: ALO´S

You should go to San Isidro to visit this small restaurant, which seats only 28 people and has been recently added to the gourmet offer in the Northern Area. Interesting fact: it has its own orchard in the back, growing its own ingredients. There is a relaxed atmosphere, reggae background music, and you may eat at the counter. Suggestions? Filled pasta are prepared with durum wheat semolina, like in Italy. Its chef, Alejandro Feraud, worked in many kitchens in Europe, New Zealand, Thailand and Buenos Aires (Nectarine, L´Osteria) before opening Alo´s.

ADDRESS: BLANCO ENCALADA 2120, SAN ISIDRO


SAN TELMO: CAFÉ SAN JUAN

After being on television, Leandro Cristobal is a celebrity chef famous all over Latin America. His two restaurants are usually filled with tourists from Colombia, Venezuela, and other countries, who request an autograph or take photos with him. Beyond fame, Cristobal dishes are substantial, original and tasty; they are a reinterpretation of recipes inherited from Spanish and Italian immigrants. Home-made pasta, marinated dishes, crystallized duck with garlic and lamb smoked sausages are among the many dishes included alternatively in the menu. It is a small place, but it operates on two shifts in order to serve better (reservation required).

ADDRESS: AVENIDA SAN JUAN 450, SAN TELMO




PALERMO: LAS PIZARRAS

Fresh and simple market dishes, with Mediterranean inspiration. That's the definition of Las pizarras (32 seats), one of the pioneers of bistronomic trend in Buenos Aires. Every day, dishes are announced at the boards covering the walls of the restaurant, owned b the talented chef Rodrigo Castilla. The specialty? Fish, and he is very good at cooking them (they are always served in the cooking point requested). It is a good place to visit over and over.

ADDRESS: THAMES 2296, PALERMO


BY CECILIA BOULLOSA

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