Must-see streets and avenues of Buenos Aires

Proposals that you can consider during your visit

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Must-see streets and avenues of Buenos Aires

Mar 05, 2020

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Proposals that you can consider during your visit

The city is ideal for walking; that is why we bring you a series of proposals that you can consider during your visit. Put on your shoes!

Walking through Buenos Aires is a good option because you can experience the life of the inhabitants and their customs. In addition, the city has streets with impressive features that deserve to be seen. This is a brief tour of some of them.


Most of these streets and Avenues of Buenos Aires are included in our classic half-day or full-day City Tour, where you can also appreciate the main tourist spots in a short time and with a specialized guide. In this way, you can select those places that most caught your attention on our City Tour and then, return and explore them carefully.





Defensa Street

Let's go to San Telmo and one of its emblematic arteries. Although Defensa starts at the Plaza de Mayo and ends at Parque Lezama, we will focus on the section between Belgrano Avenue and San Juan Avenue. His name is no accident and dates from 1849, baptized in homage to the defense of Buenos Aires against the British Invasions of 1806 and 1807.

In addition to a wonderful architecture with some colonial details combined with some more modern buildings, Defense is characterized by its paving stones, giving it a distinctive touch and even a characteristic sound that is heard when the vehicles circulate. Tip: never wear high heels.
Along the route, you can also see some of the old houses that survived over the years, in which they sell objects of all kinds and times, so it is possible to buy some historical souvenir.



The Convent of Santo Domingo is also found in Defensa and Belgrano Avenue, as well as and the Basilica Nuestra Señora del Rosario, which dates from 1773 and where the remains of the hero Manuel Belgrano rest.


Defensa Street - Buenos Aires
Defensa Street - Buenos Aires


Then, at the intersection with Chile Street, a mini statue of Mafalda waits sitting on a bench next to his friends Susanita and Manolito. There begins the Comic Strip Walk and at different points of the walk you can see some picturesque characters of great Argentine cartoonists. There is also a gastronomic pole that offers different options. A few meters after the statue of Mafalda, there is the Zanjón de Granados or Tercero del Sur, which was an old stream discovered by chance in a house that you can visit.

Then, we have Carlos Calvo and the huge San Telmo Market located after Independencia Avenue and Estados Unidos Street. This place dates from the 19th century and is completely remodeled, but without losing the main essence. There you can get fruits, vegetables, legumes and meats for everyday purchases, antiques and leather articles. But one of the most important attractions has to do with its gastronomic offer since you can find both typical Argentine dishes and Swiss street food. There is something for all tastes and budgets.

A few meters away and at the intersection with Humberto 1st Street is the iconic Dorrego Square, in which, although it is small, tango predominates, since there are always dancers demonstrating their skills. This area is also perfect for walking at night, as there are bars and pubs with interesting cultural proposals.

Before arriving at San Juan Avenue, in Defense, you will find the House of the Ezeiza or Pasaje de la Defensa, an old house built in 1880 that belonged to the Ezeiza family and is now a gallery. Beyond shopping, do not miss the patio or the upper floor. 

Defensa Street - Buenos Aires
Defensa between San Juan Ave. and Belgrano Ave.


Corrientes Avenue

From Florida to Callao, Corrientes Avenue has two faces: day and night.

During the day - and from Monday to Friday - the maelstrom of Buenos Aires is an attraction in itself, because in this area are the majority of offices and banks where many people work. The traffic during the morning and afternoon is usually a bit overwhelming, but it is still part of the idiosyncrasy of the place. In spite of everything, you can appreciate the greatness of the avenue and do some shopping.

Corrientes Avenue - Buenos Aires
Corrientes Avenue - Buenos Aires


At night, everything changes, as if a magic wand illuminates the place, because Corrientes never sleeps. While one of its lanes becomes pedestrian -from 7 PM to 2 AM-, in the section that goes from Callao Avenue to Liberty Street, the lights and theater posters illuminate all the way. That is why it is called the Argentine Broadway. Important fact: Many of the bookstores on the avenue still open late in the night, so the cultural offer expands and you can find beautiful perfectly preserved relics.



If you are hungry, the range of gastronomic proposals is immense, although pizza is the favorite. In stone or in mold, with a melted mozzarella in each portion, Corrientes Avenue stands out for having the best pizzerias in the city. In some places, you can choose a captive combo that includes a portion of faina and a glass of moscato. They say that part of the Buenos Aires spirit is there, so surely tourists are going to feel like one.

Corrientes Avenue - Buenos Aires
Corrientes Ave. between Florida and Callao


9 de Julio Avenue

Its 140 meters wide made it famous and is considered the widest in the world. Originally, it has 14 lanes, but there are 20 if we add those of the parallel streets (Cerrito and Pellegrini). You can cross the avenue in sections, although some people like to challenge time and do it at once. July 9 starts on San Juan Avenue and ends on Liberator Avenue, although, the intersection with Corrientes Avenue is the most interesting section. In the heart of the Republic Square, where the Obelisk is also located with its almost 66 meters high, this place is an essential point for tourists who want to buy a typical Buenos Aires postcard.

9 de Julio Avenue - Buenos Aires
9 de Julio Avenue - Buenos Aires


In 2013, the Metrobus was inaugurated; it consists of four exclusive lanes for buses that run throughout the avenue. This system allowed traffic to decrease on 9 de Julio Avenue, so that users travel part of the city more easily. The subway lines B, C and D also converge, so you can have different accesses.




Another important detail is that you can see the native vegetation throughout the Avenue and in November it is possible to see the jacaranda trees bloom, showing its beautiful purplish blue flowers.

9 de Julio Avenue - Buenos Aires
9 de Julio Ave. between Del Libertador Ave. and San Juan Ave.


North Diagonal

Also known as Roque Sáenz Peña Avenue, this particular artery begins at the intersection of San Martín Street, where the Metropolitan Cathedral and the former Uruguayan-Argentinian Bank are located, devised by Eduardo Le Monnier in 1928. This building has two basement levels and eight upper floors plus a dome with a lantern at 56 meters high. It is currently the building of the Minister of Modernization and was remodeled a few months ago.

The Diagonal has buildings with a height of 67.5 meters, just like the Obelisk, and has 10 floors, which indicates that the Avenue was specially planned. French architecture reappears in some buildings and it is no accident since Buenos Aires was going to be a European city. In its golden years, this avenue was very important at the socio-economic level. On this avenue, banks, financial and insurance companies were founded, among other companies related to capital. Some buildings continue with their original activity, others belong to government entities, hotels or other activities, but they respect the facade.

North Diagonal - Buenos Aires
North Diagonal - Buenos Aires


The intersection with Florida is one of the most interesting points since there is a monument to Roque Sáenz Peña and in addition five very important domes of the Diagonal converge. Two buildings have the surname Bencich (famous builders). The first has two domes and bears the last name for the Massimiliano and Miguel brothers; the other is for their uncle. On the other dome was the former Boston Bank (currently there is the International Bank of China I.C.B.C), with a facade made of carved limestone brought from the United States, and the mansion belongs to "La Equitativa del Plata" that honors the pyramid of Djoser.

Another detail: A few months ago, in North Diagonal and Cerrito, they placed some steps that emulate those of the Times Square in New York, allowing to appreciate the Obelisk and 9 de Julio Avenue.

North Diagonal - Buenos Aires
North Diagonal between Rivadavia Ave. and Carlos Pellegrini St.


3246 Artigas Street, third floor

The Rawson Neighborhood, located in Agronomy, is a small paradise in the middle of the city. It is in the middle of a triangle formed by Tinogasta, Zamudio Street and San Martín Avenue. With low-rise and English-style houses surrounded by large trees, this neighborhood reflects the writer Julio Cortázar in all its corners, where he lived until he went to Paris. We are located at 3246 Artigas Street in a gray building with four floors. The writer lived on the third floor; the epicenter of the followers of his works.

3246 Artigas Street - Buenos Aires
3246 Artigas Street - Buenos Aires


“Julio Cortázar (1914-1984) lived in this building. The atmosphere of the Rawson and Agronomy neighborhood is present in several of his stories”, says a plaque placed by the City Government in 2000. Opposite is the Carlos de la Púa small square, where there are usually hopscotches on the floor or in the street, as a tribute to the author. This is the heart of the neighborhood, which gives a 360° perspective to a very quiet environment.

A few meters away, there is a new tribute: A café-restaurant, called Rayuela that offers a varied menu. It is one of the few businesses in the neighborhood. The decoration of the place allows you to continue immersed in the universe of Cortázar.

3246 Artigas Street - Buenos Aires
3246 Artigas Street - Buenos Aires


Boedo Avenue

From San Juan to Independencia, art, especially tango, is very present in this avenue. To begin with, the Homero Manzi Corner, between San Juan Avenue and Boedo Avenue, is witness to an important part of the history of tango in the city. The bar was opened in 1927, but it was in 1981 that it got a definitive name. This corner became a symbol in the 40s, in full swing of tango. Great musicians and intellectuals sat at their tables, among them the songwriter, politician and film director Homero Manzi, who was the author of "Sur" and whose first stanza starts saying "San Juan y Boedo antiguo y todo el cielo" (Ancient San Juan and Boedo and all heaven)

Boedo Avenue - Buenos Aires
Boedo Avenue - Buenos Aires


The place was declared a Notable Café in 2004 by the Commission for the Protection and Promotion of Notable Cafes, Pubs, Billiards and Candy Shops of the City of Buenos Aires and the corner was declared a Historic Protection Area (APH, Área de Protección Histórica) with a level of prudential protection by law 67 of the same year.

Passing Carlos Calvo Street (always through Boedo) is the Pan y Arte Theater, where you can eat some typical Argentine dishes and attend one of the Varieté offered in the theater.

You can also find the Margot Café that opened in 1904. Here you could find characters like the Monkey Gatica, Alfredo Palacios and the intellectuals of Boedo's group, among others. Its brick walls reflect the long history of the place through different portraits and posters.

Boedo Avenue - Buenos Aires
Boedo Avenue between San Juan Ave. and Independencia Ave.


Melián Avenue

From Olazabal to La Pampa, the green of the Tipa trees that are located on Melián Avenue stands out on the sidewalks of Belgrano R. That is not all, this avenue is considered by many inhabitants as one of the most beautiful in the city. Its tranquility, especially on weekends, is one of the strengths, in addition to its beauty, mainly on the facade of English-style houses. The cobbled street also gives it a distinctive and unique touch.

Melian Avenue - Buenos Aires
Melian Avenue - Buenos Aires


We recommend you to walk slowly so that you appreciate the architecture of the place. An important detail: Thanks to the trees, this avenue is ideal for walking in summer since the temperature drops five degrees.

Melian Avenue - Buenos Aires
Melian Avenue between La Pampa St. and Olazabal Ave.


Alvear Avenue

As part of the elegance and glamor here lies part of the Argentine aristocracy; you can see it throughput its seven blocks and in the buildings inspired by French academicism, such as the Duhau Residence or the Álzaga Unzué Palace, home of the Jockey Club. 

Alvear Avenue - Buenos Aires
Alvear Avenue - Buenos Aires


One of the most prominent is the five-star Alvear Palace Hotel, which is distinguished by its majestic European architecture and decoration that combines the classic, inspired by the Belle Époque, and the modern. In addition, in 2003 it was declared a Historic Monument of the City of Buenos Aires.



On the other hand, in the section that connects Plaza Francia with Callao, shopping enthusiasts have access to high-level national and international stores that offer jewelry, clothing, and perfumes, as well as other high-quality elements.

Alvear Avenue - Buenos Aires
Alvear Avenue between Arroyo St. and Del Libertador Ave.


Arroyo Street

Starts in Juncal and Esmeralda and ends at Alvear Avenue. In its four blocks located in the Retiro neighborhood, Arroyo offers almost a parallel world near the center of the City of Buenos Aires.

Arroyo Street - Buenos Aires
Arroyo Street - Buenos Aires


You can see important French-style buildings, the Estrugamou Palace, built in 1929, which has a bronze replica of the Winged Victory of Samothrace in the courtyard. You will also find the Mihanovich Tower or Bencich Tower, the former Celedonio Pereda residence, which currently functions as the Brazilian embassy.

In addition, Arroyo Street functions as a nerve center for art galleries and cultural activities. It hosts an important event such as the Gallery Nights, an event that takes place every year and where galleries and other art spaces are open to the public.

Arroyo Street - Buenos Aires
Arroyo Street between Cerrito St. and Esmeralda St.


Santa Fe Avenue

This 40-block avenue begins on Florida Street, in San Martín Square and ends in the Patricios Regiment in the Palermo neighborhood, where Cabildo Avenue starts. This avenue is an open-air shopping center where you can find various quality items, especially in the section between Callao and 9 de Julio, but there is something for everyone, mainly clothing and footwear.

Santa Fe Avenue - Buenos Aires
Santa Fe Avenue - Buenos Aires


This avenue also has a corner appreciated by locals and tourists: the Grand Splendid Athenaeum. It is located at 1860 and is one of the largest branches of the bookstore chain that completely renovated the cinema that was there. Its architecture reminds of the Paris Opera House. Its large maze of books of all genres, from classic books to books fresh off the press, makes readers lost in that world. In the old stage, there is a cafeteria where you can have a drink while enjoying a good reading.

Santa Fe Avenue - Buenos Aires
Santa Fe Avenue between Cerrito St. and Riobamba St.


May Avenue (Avenida de Mayo)

It dates from 1894 and is inspired by the Gran Vía of Madrid. It is one of the most important avenues of the City and houses some of the most emblematic buildings such as La Inmobiliaria, a building with red domes; the Theater Avenue and the London City bar, one of the favorite of writer Julio Cortázar.

We recommend you carefully look at each building so you do not miss any architecture details. Something that you can also see at the subway entrance of Line A is that it preserves its old structure.

May Avenue - Buenos Aires
May Avenue - Buenos Aires


The Barolo Palace is on 1370 May Avenue (Hire your tour to the Barolo Palace here), which until 1935 was the biggest in the city. Although it is now an office site, the most important structure imagined by its creator Luigi Barolo is still preserved. Its lighthouse is an emblem, as well as the architecture of the place that is inspired by the Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri.

A few blocks later, at 825, is Café Tortoni, a placid place with marble tables where important figures such as Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Federico García Lorca and Carlos Gardel have sat.

May Avenue - Buenos Aires
May Avenue between Bolivar St. and Pres. Luis Saenz Peña St.


Libertador Avenue

It starts at Retiro and continue to Leandro Alem Avenue. Its 35 kilometers run through the neighborhoods of Palermo, Recoleta, Belgrano and Núñez, then continue through the north of Gran Buenos Aires until it ends in San Fernando.

One of the most interesting sections is between Pueyrredón Avenue and Sarmiento Avenue.  To begin with, at 1473 is the National Museum of Fine Arts, where you can see collections of Argentine art, pre-Hispanic and American colonial art, among other permanent exhibitions and other itinerant.

Libertador Avenue - Buenos Aires
Libertador Avenue - Buenos Aires


On 1902 Liberator Avenue is the Museum of Decorative Art, which has collections of sculptures, paintings, tapestries, weapons, books, ceramics, furniture and mainly European and oriental miniatures, from the 16th to the 20th centuries. There are also permanent exhibitions and temporary exhibitions there.

The journey continues through wide paths and lush vegetation, in addition to some green lungs; although, the main attraction is at the intersection with Sarmiento Avenue, where one of the entrances to the Palermo Woods is located.

Also known as Tres de Febrero Park, it is an ideal place for outdoor activities such as hiking, running, bike rides or just sitting down to rest or have a picnic. Its two lakes are an oasis in the middle of the city and can be traveled by boat or water bike; however, it shares its prominence with the Galileo Galilei Planetarium and its immense structure inspired by the planet Saturn.

Libertador Avenue - Buenos Aires
Libertador Avenue between Dorrego Ave. and Pueyrredon Ave.


Caminito

A street-museum? In La Boca you can find one. This small alley is a must-see place for any tourist, as well as one of the most popular for taking photos since it has many stories to tell. The conventillos with different colored plates and their cobblestone through its 150 meters, are a passage of time that is between the streets Lamadrid and the Iberlucea Valley.

Caminito - Buenos Aires
Caminito - Buenos Aires


This section belonged to the route of the railway that went to Ensenada until 1928, when it was closed and the road became an abandoned alley. In 1950, as an initiative of the artist Benito Quinquela Martín -whose work is reflected throughout the neighborhood- and the neighbors became a pedestrian street-museum where works by other artists are also shown.

Currently, in addition to plastic artists and artisans, you can enjoy an outdoor tango show or taste the typical Argentine barbecue at a nearby restaurant.  

Caminito - Buenos Aires
Caminito between Lamadrid St. and Magallanes St.


Alicia Moreau de Justo Avenue

Puerto Madero is the youngest and most modern neighborhood in the City of Buenos Aires. It stands out for the real estate ventures and for the tranquility despite being close to the Buenos Aires Downtown. The place could be described as a parallel world.

Its streets and avenues are named after illustrious women of the country and one of the most important is Alicia Moreau de Justo Avenue. In its sidewalks you can see old docks and it is almost a gateway to the neighborhood. Each building was restored and bought mainly by restaurants -there is an important gastronomic center there- but there are also various offices of companies such as Google, the Cinemark complex and the Catholic University of Argentina.

Alicia Moreau de Justo Avenue - Buenos Aires
Alicia Moreau de Justo Avenue - Buenos Aires


You can walk on the street or by the river. The latter is recommended in summer to feel the gentle breeze and enjoy an outdoor walk with a completely clear landscape.

This avenue is the continuation of Antarctica Argentina Avenue (which begins in Retiro) and ends on Juan de Garay Avenue, under the 25 de Mayo Highway.

One of the most important places is at 900 where the Sarmiento Frigate Museum Ship is located, which you can visit every day from 10 AM at 7 PM. A few meters away is also the Women's Bridge that represents a couple dancing tango and is the first work of the Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava in Latin America.

This swing pedestrian bridge has one of the largest turning mechanisms in the world, which was designed to give way to vessels that sailing on the levees.

Alicia Moreau de Justo Avenue - Buenos Aires
Alicia Moreau de Justo Avenue between Rosario Vera Peñaloza St. and Mariquita Sanchez de Thompson St.


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